This Cafe Bridges the Gap Between Traditional and Modern Interior Design

'Patisserie by Franziska' by Poetic Spaces

A bakery-cafe inspired by Indian Heritage, incorporating interior elements that bridge the gap between traditional and modern interior design.


'Patisserie by Franziska' is one of the famous hospitality chains in Kolkata, West Bengal. The brief from the client was to create a bakery cafe interior informed to take inspiration from Indian Heritage by bridging the gap between traditional and modern interior design.  The total area of the project was a tiny 890 Sq. Ft. The layout of the space has been created in a way that it separates the dining space from the bar area to avoid free flow of people walking in and out of the space. It has couches and group tables on one side while a long counter table has single seats for those who would rather not socialize.

Picture Courtesy: RAPA Chartered Architects

The cafe palette is informed by Indian interiors, from Rajasthani Royal Palaces to every day coffee houses, placing marble with mirror and cane - materials that are found throughout India. Colour combination is green, saffron with blue inspired by the Indian flag. 

To pick up a single theme has a reputation of being overboard and isn't too trendy. Designers at Portic Spaces built a theme that defined the arrant look of the entire brand including menus, signage and in-fact the cutlery too. The space was created to give a Modern Vintage Patisserie look with a tone of warm and cool colours complemented with warm lighting. To give it a deco twist the curves of the façade windows and panels are echoed within the interior through arches and recesses, architectural details that are also celebrated by an inset border. 

Picture Courtesy: RAPA Chartered Architects

To redefine the character a contemporary pallet of light walls was combined with a dark floor along with the inclusion of black cane chairs, matching the decor.  The goal was to design customized chairs, with local materials and local manufactures in mind. The window being right in the center of the space was used to bring in natural light. The design incorporates natural materials such as wooden floors, pine wood wall paneling as well as a calming neutral colour palette that mixes ochre and muted earthy colour tones of green, blue and orange.

Picture Courtesy: RAPA Chartered Architects

Tables are individually lit to create a warm and welcoming ambiance. To make it slightly more inviting from the plush side the use of brass framework was done adequately on leg bases, frame of seating stools and accent lighting. The use of fabric sofas with several cushions was a saint's choice in terms of the diversity of colours available and the quest to achieve less bulky and ideal seating comfort for the visitors since it occupied a substantial portion of the seating. Beside the sofa a burnished open storage unit that openly displays books,ingredients display went along with the seating section where we would ideally sip our coffee. 


Following the millennial trend, the designers decided to play with terrazzo as a material, as style that has seeped in over the last few years. This was incorporated in two tables designed with a neutral pattern of decor greeting the vintage aesthetics. 

Picture Courtesy: RAPA Chartered Architects

Ultimately, as with all these detailing it ended up nothing like our original sketches. However, I believe "It's a much more beautiful space for it". The simplicity of the space, and the lack of pompousness with the calming aesthetics made it a light-filled and an inviting space.


Project: Patisserie by Franziska  Location: Park Street, Kolkata Design House: Poetic Spaces 

Interior Designer : Raveena Sirohia 

Photographer : Abhishek Banerjee 


Blog

Know More

Connect With Us!

Follow our social media outlets or subscribe to the weekly newsletter.

  • White Instagram Icon
  • White Facebook Icon
  • Twitter

©2020 THE DESIGN COLLECTIVE, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 TDC Magazine is a digital publication and online magazine that serves as a curated, hand-picked and carefully edited assemblage of the latest in architecture, design and artThe material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of The Design Collective Magazine & Studio.